For information about the Harsh Collection, you may ask a librarian on the Chicago Public Library website.

Chicago Public Library

Guide to the Richard Durham Papers, 1939 - 1999

Finding aid prepared by Allyson Hobbs, August 2007

Descriptive Summary

Title:

Richard Durham Papers

Dates:

1939 - 1999

Size:

14 archival boxes, 8 linear feet

Repository:

Chicago Public Library
Carter G. Woodson Regional Library
Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature
9525 S. Halsted St.
Chicago, IL 60628

Subject Headings

Durham, Richard

African Americans

Access

No restrictions

Citation

When quoting material from this collection, the preferred citation is:

Richard Durham Papers, [Box #, Folder #], Chicago Public Library, Carter G. Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature

Acknowledgements

Funding to process this collection and compose its finding aid was provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Provenance

Clarice Durham, wife of Richard Durham, donated the Richard Durham Papers to the Chicago Public Library, Carter G. Woodson Regional Library, Vivian G. Harsh Research Collection of Afro-American History and Literature in June, November and December of 1998.

Richard Durham created Destination Freedom, a groundbreaking radio series that dramatized the struggle for civil rights in America. Destination Freedom aired on WMAQ, a Chicago radio station, on Sunday mornings from 1948 to 1950. In March 2005, Clarice Durham donated the ninety-one audiotapes to the Museum of Broadcast Communications. Portions of this collection are available on the online archives section of the Museum of Broadcast Communications website (http://www.museum.tv/home.php) and the complete collection is available for listening at the Museum of Broadcast Communications, located at 400 North State Street, Suite 240, Chicago, Illinois, 60610.

Richard Durham's essay, "Don't Spend Your Money Where You Can't Work" (1938?), from the Negro Newspaper Study, is located in the Illinois Writers' Project collection, Box 41, Folder 7. This essay borrows its title from a slogan of the Chicago Whip newspaper and describes the movement that used the black consumer boycott as part of an appeal for economic justice.

Several documents relating to the appearances of the Destination Freedom cast at the George Cleveland Hall Branch of the Chicago Public Library are located in the Hall Branch Library Archives, Box 3.

Biographical Note

Richard Durham was born on September 6, 1917 in Raymond, Mississippi, a small rural community in Hindes County. His father, a farmer, aspired to a better life outside of the South and moved the family to Chicago when Durham was seven years old. Durham attended Hyde Park High School and Northwestern University. While at Northwestern, Durham joined the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration and received training and experience as a radio scriptwriter. When this project ended, Durham joined the staff of the Chicago Defender. Durham's first major experience with radio came between 1946 and 1948 when he wrote scripts for a series on black achievement, Democracy U.S.A., which aired on WBBM, a CBS station. A workplace injury unexpectedly furthered Durham's writing career. While working at a shade cleaning plant, he injured his foot by standing in a chemical solution with shoes that were not waterproof. While he was recovering, his sister gave him a typewriter and he began to write poetry and soon won first prize in a poetry contest. Durham also wrote scripts for Here Comes Tomorrow, a black soap opera that aired on WJJD. Destination Freedom, a dramatic radio series on WMAQ in Chicago, brought the freedom struggles of African Americans to Chicago listening audiences on Sunday mornings between 1948 and 1950. Durham's prolific writing career would span four decades and would extend far beyond radio: Durham edited the official publication of the Nation of Islam, Muhammad Speaks in the 1960s; he created the television series Bird of the Iron Feather in the early 1970s; he co-authored The Greatest, the autobiography of boxing champion Muhammad Ali, which was published in 1977; and he wrote numerous speeches for Chicago's first African American mayor, Harold Washington, in the 1980s.

The premier of Destination Freedom on June 27, 1948 signaled a landmark in African American broadcasting history. Drawing on the talents of young intellectuals and entertainers including Oscar Brown Jr., Studs Terkel, Janice Kingslow, Wezlyn Tilden, Fred Pinkard and Vernon Jarrett, Durham developed scripts that captured the lives and struggles of everyday men and women as well as prominent African Americans. Unlike the typical radio fare of its time, Destination Freedom featured social dramas that eloquently appealed for racial justice. As Durham explained, "the real-life story of a single Negro in Alabama walking into a voting booth across a Ku Klux Klan line has more drama and world implications than all the stereotypes Hollywood or radio can turn out in a thousand years." In striking contrast to the hackneyed images of blacks and as a remedy to the gross underrepresentation of blacks in radio production, Durham cast black actors in leading roles and told the stories of activists and leaders including Frederick Douglass, Toussaint L'Ouverture and Mary Church Terrell; writers and artists including Richard Wright, Katherine Dunham and Gwendolyn Brooks and cultural legends such as Stackalee and John Henry.

Hours of careful research at the George Cleveland Hall Branch of the Chicago Public Library with Vivian Harsh's assistance, close readings of autobiographies, monographs and speeches and skilled scriptwriting brought these historical and contemporary figures to life in poignant detail on Destination Freedom. Certain of the redemptive power of black history and education, Durham went beyond recounting the biographies of these figures and focused on the ways that they overcame racial injustice through resistance. Durham challenged network protocols to ensure that the series featured black women as equally important, history-making figures. The series lacked a sponsor for most of the time it aired on WMAQ, but by relying on his earlier connections, Durham persuaded the Chicago Defender to fund the first weeks of the broadcast and the Urban League sponsored several broadcasts in 1950. Despite Durham's efforts to exercise authorial control over the series, WMAQ edited, controlled final script approval and rejected the more controversial stories of the lives of Nat Turner and Paul Robeson. Despite these conflicts, the station recognized the import and the success of the show when in 1949, it won a prestigious first-place award from the Institute for Education by Radio. On the anniversary of its first episode, Illinois Governor Adlai Stevenson commended the program for its efforts in increasing racial tolerance and in educating the public on the contributions of African Americans. Despite these accolades, WMAQ canceled Destination Freedom in 1950, just as the rising tide of anti-Communist conservatism began to adversely affect radio and the arts.

Durham remained actively involved in civil rights struggles throughout his life. In the 1950s, he worked as the national program director of the United Packinghouse Workers of America. Durham was hired to write a pamphlet on the accomplishments of the union's anti-discrimination department. The pamphlet, "Action Against Jim Crow: UPWA's Fight for Equal Rights," described the progressive work of the union to end job discrimination and to elevate women to equal status and equal pay in the workplace. The union was so pleased with Durham's work that they hired him as the head of the program office and he wrote and developed materials to publicize the union's programs and events. But conflict arose as Durham continued to put pressure on the union to support and to prioritize black advancement. In 1957, he was forced to resign.

After leaving the union, Durham worked as a freelance journalist. In the 1960s, he became the editor of Muhammad Speaks, the weekly publication of Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam. Durham sought to provide an international perspective to the newspaper and included several articles on the independence struggles of African nations in the 1960s. In 1971, Durham created a television series, Bird of the Iron Feather, which aired on WTTW, a local PBS station in Chicago. Described as a "soul drama" and funded by the Ford Foundation, this series was praised for introducing more authentic television programming and for portraying African American life in a more realistic fashion. Given the dearth of blacks in television production, Bird of the Iron Feather broke new ground by being almost exclusively written, directed and produced by blacks. While working as an editor for Muhammad Speaks, Durham was asked to assist Muhammad Ali in writing his autobiography, The Greatest, which was published in 1977.

Richard Durham met Clarice Davis in the early 1940s while working with the National Negro Congress. Clarice was born in Mobile, Alabama and moved to Chicago when she was eleven years old. She attended Wendell Phillips High School until it was temporarily closed because of a fire. She graduated from DuSable High School where she was the valedictorian of her class. The couple married in 1942. During their married life, Mrs. Durham made significant contributions to Durham's work by reading, editing and typing many of the Destination Freedom scripts. Mrs. Durham has remained a lifelong human rights activist. After working for the National Negro Congress, she was a member of the Progressive Party in Chicago in the late 1940s. Mrs. Durham continues to be an activist for the Chicago chapter of the National Alliance against Racist and Political Repression and has campaigned for freedom for Mark Clements, a victim of police torture.

Richard Durham died on April 27, 1984 while on a trip from Chicago to New York. At the time of his death, Durham was researching the life of Hannibal, the illustrious Carthagenian warrior who planned to conquer Rome. Mayor Harold Washington delivered the eulogy at his memorial service and a number of famous Chicagoans including historian Dempsey Travis, entertainer and former Destination Freedom cast member Oscar Brown Jr. and Congressmen Charles Hayes and Gus Savage attended the service.

In August 2007, Richard Durham was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame.

Scope and Content Note

The Richard Durham Collection is comprised mostly of manuscripts and primarily includes scripts written for the Destination Freedom and Bird of the Iron Feather series. Additional manuscript material includes scripts written for Democracy, U.S.A. as well as the page proofs for the autobiography of Muhammad Ali, The Greatest, published in 1977. The collection also contains clippings, correspondence, photographs and serials. The collection is organized into the following three series: Manuscripts, Photographs and Audio-Visual Materials, and Serials.

Manuscripts, Boxes 1-12 (1939 - 1978)

The manuscripts series comprise the lion's share of the collection. Boxes 1-4 consist of Destination Freedom scripts, which are organized by airdate. These scripts include the stories of numerous African American leaders, activists and cultural figures including W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, John Henry, Gwendolyn Brooks, and "Fats" Waller. The scripts from a two-part series exploring racial prejudice and racial violence and a program on housing inequality in Chicago are also included. A folder in Box 4 titled "Destination Freedom memorabilia" consists of correspondence from May 1949 regarding the appearance of the cast at the Parkway Community House as well as a first anniversary program and materials on "Destination Freedom Week," a series of events promoted by the Chicago Radio Listeners Appreciation Guild. Box 5 consists of scripts that Durham wrote while he was a member of the WPA's Writers' Project. These scripts, from the Great Artists Series, were broadcast on WGN between 1940 and 1942 and include stories on Spanish painter Francisco Goya, Mexican painter Jose Orozco, and French painter Henri Matisse. Clippings of articles about racial injustice written by Richard Durham for the Chicago Defender are also contained in Box 5, such as: "Crump Thinks Negroes Given Fair Treatment," in which Durham interviewed Edward Crump, the head of Memphis' Democratic political party (April 8, 1944); an article about a bellboy who was flogged by a deputy in a county jail in Belleville, Illinois (August 5, 1944); and an article about Owosso, Michigan, the hometown of Governor Thomas Dewey, the Republican nominee for President, in which residents boasted of "never allowing a Negro to stay overnight" (August 22, 1944). While working as the national program director of the United Packinghouse Workers of America, Durham created a pamphlet, "Action Against Jim Crow: UPWA's Fight for Equal Rights." Included in Box 5, this pamphlet tells the story of an experienced packinghouse worker who could not get a job at Swift & Company because of racial discrimination. The worker's experiences are juxtaposed with her son's service in the armed forces during the Korean War. The worker's son wonders why black men are dying overseas for a country that refuses to provide decent jobs for all of its citizens.

Box 6 contains Durham's research notes taken while he was writing the scripts for Destination Freedom and a copy of Earl Dickerson's speech for the ASP Negro Rights Forum given in the 1940s. This box also consists of various correspondence including letters regarding Muhammad Ali's autobiography, The Greatest and letters that discussed the television series Bird of the Iron Feather. Of particular interest is a handwritten note from artist Jacob Lawrence dated May 17, 1949 that provides Lawrence's biographical information and a list of his achievements. Letters from Mamie Till Mobley, the mother of Emmett Till, to government officials requesting copies of all documents listed under the name of Emmett Till's father, Louis Till, are also included. Durham helped Mobley to draft these letters and urged her to submit them before access to such information, granted by the Freedom of Information Act, was curtailed by the Reagan administration. Poetry by Richard Durham, including poems published in the Chicago Defender in 1937 and 1938, are also included. One letter is of special note: Durham corresponded with Langston Hughes and received a letter dated September 10, 1939 regarding Hughes' comments on Durham's poetry. Copies of Durham's poems with Hughes' handwritten notations accompany the letter.

Box 7 includes scripts from Democracy, U.S.A. and Bird of the Iron Feather. Box 8 contains fragments of scripts and a biographical sketch of Durham. Materials related to Durham's lawsuit against NBC comprise Box 9. Durham filed suit to gain NBC's admission that Destination Freedom was Durham's exclusive creation and property. After Destination Freedom was canceled, the network used the same title to broadcast a show that aired at the same time with a similar format. Box 10 includes scripts from Bird of the Iron Feather, and Boxes 11 and 12 contain typescript and page proofs from Muhammad Ali's autobiography, The Greatest.

Photographs and Audio-Visual Materials, Box 13 (1949, 1970, 1999, 2007)

This series includes twenty-nine photographs, mostly of the cast members of Destination Freedom. These photographs capture the cast reading scripts and participating in community programs. Individual photographs feature the following actors: Louise Pruitt, Fred Pinkard, Oscar Brown, Jr., and Janice Kingslow. Other photographs capture Richard Durham sitting at his typewriter, writing Destination Freedom. This series also contains a reprint of Destination Freedom publicity materials, a photograph of Richard Durham while he is being interviewed about Bird of the Iron Feather, historical photographs of Ida B. Wells Barnett, a reproduction of a page from a script on Harriet Tubman and an honorable withdrawal card from the American Newspaper Guild.

This series also includes two audio-visual materials: a VHS tape, "The Sound of Freedom," by Afaf Qayyum from the 1999 Chicago Metro History Fair and an interview with Clarice Davis Durham and Charles Durham recorded by StoryCorps Griot in July 2007.

Serials, Box 14 (1964 - 1975)

This series includes copies of Muhammad Speaks, the publication of the Nation of Islam, which Durham edited. Durham brought an international perspective to the newspaper and included several articles on the independence struggles of African nations in the 1960s. Also contained in this series are the oversized, bound editions of Muhammad Speaks, published between September 1964 and April 1967.

INVENTORY

Series I: Manuscripts, 1939 - 1978

Box 1

Folder 1

Radio Log: Destination Freedom, 1948 - 1950

Radio log, list of programs airing on Destination Freedom between 1948 and 1950

Box 1

Folder 2

"Crispus Attucks," 6/27/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Crispus Attucks

Box 1

Folder 3

Harriet Tubman, 7/4/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program, "Railway to Freedom, The Story of Harriet Tubman"

Box 1

Folder 4

"Dark Explorers," 7/11/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Negro explorers

Box 1

Folder 5

"Saga of Denmark Vesey," 7/18/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Denmark Vesey

Box 1

Folder 6

Frederick Douglass, Part I, 7/25/48

Script for "The Making of a Man" program on Frederick Douglass

Box 1

Folder 7

Frederick Douglass, Part II, 8/1/48

Script for Part II of Frederick Douglass program

Box 1

Folder 8

U.G. Dailey and Daniel Hale Williams, 8/8/48

Script for "The Heart of Geo. Cotton," The Story of Dr. U.G. Dailey and Dr. Daniel Hale Williams

Box 1

Folder 9

Sojourner Truth, 8/15/48

Script for "Truth Goes to Washington," The Story of Sojourner Truth

Box 1

Folder 10

Matthew Henson, 8/22/48

Script for "Arctic Autograph," The Story of Matthew Henson

Box 1

Folder 11

Sen. Charles Caldwell, 8/29/48

Script for "The Story of 1875," The Life and Death of Senator Charles Caldwell

Box 1

Folder 12

James Weldon Johnson, 9/5/48

Script for "Poet in Pine Mill," The Story of James Weldon Johnson

Box 1

Folder 13

"'Father of the Blues' -- W.C. Handy," 9/12/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on W.C. Handy

Box 1

Folder 14

J. Ernest Wilkins, 9/19/48

Script for "Boy with a Dream," The Story of Dr. J. Ernest Wilkins

Box 1

Folder 15

"Shakespeare of Harlem -- Langston Hughes," 9/26/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Langston Hughes

Box 1

Folder 16

"Citizen Toussaint," 10/3/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Toussaint L'Ouverture

Box 1

Folder 17

Little David (Joe Louis) 10/10/48

Script for program on Joe Louis

Box 1

Folder 18

George Washington Carver, 10/17/48

Script for program, "The Boy Who Was Traded for a Horse," The Story of George Washington Carver

Box 1

Folder 19

Duke Ellington, 11/7/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Echoes of Harlem," The Story of Duke Ellington

Box 1

Folder 20

Mary McLeod Bethune, 11/14/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "One Out of Seventeen," The Story of Mary McLeod Bethune

Box 1

Folder 21

Jackie Robinson, 11/21/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Rime of the Ancient Dodger," The Story of Jackie Robinson

Box 1

Folder 22

Walter White, 11/28/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Investigator for Democracy," The Story of Walter White

Box 1

Folder 23

Dorie Miller, 12/5/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Autobiography of a Hero," The Story of Dorie Miller

Box 1

Folder 24

Albert Merritt, 12/12/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Pied Piper vs. Paul Revere," The Story of Albert Merritt

Box 1

Folder 25

Marian Anderson, 12/19/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Choir Girl from Philadelphia," The Story of Marian Anderson

Box 1

Folder 26

Willard Motley, 12/26/48, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Willard Motley

Box 2

Folder 1

Oscar DePriest, 1/2/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Maiden Speech," The Story of Oscar DePriest

Box 2

Folder 2

William Hastie, 1/9/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Boy Who Beat the Bus," The Story of William H. Hastie

Box 2

Folder 3

Hazel Scott, 1/16/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Chopin Murder Case," The Story of Hazel Scott

Box 2

Folder 4

Jesse Owens, 1/23/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "World's Fastest Human," The Story of Jesse Owens

Box 2

Folder 5

332nd Fighter Group, 1/30/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Last Letter Home," The Story of the 332nd Fighter Group

Box 2

Folder 6

W.E.B. DuBois, 2/6/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Search for History," The Story of W.E.B. DuBois

Box 2

Folder 7

"Death of Aesop," 2/13/49, Dest. Freedom

Script

Box 2

Folder 8

Ralph J. Bunche, 2/20/49, Dest. Freedom

"Peace Mediator," The Story of Dr. Ralph J. Bunche

Box 2

Folder 9

Paul Williams, 2/27/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The House that Paul Built," The Story of Paul Williams

Box 2

Folder 10

"Life of Canada Lee," 3/6/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Do Something - Be Somebody," The Life of Canada Lee

Box 2

Folder 11

Booker T. Washington, 3/13/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Up from Slavery," The Story of Booker T. Washington

Box 2

Folder 12

Richard Wright, 3/20/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Black Boy," The Autobiography of Richard Wright

Box 2

Folder 13

Charles R. Drew, 3/27/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Transfusion," The Story of Dr. Charles R. Drew

Box 2

Folder 14

Countee Cullen, 4/3/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Pagan Poet," The Story of Countee Cullen

Box 2

Folder 15

Ida B. Wells, 4/10/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Woman with a Mission," The Story of Ida B. Wells

Box 2

Folder 16

Paul Laurence Dunbar, 4/17/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Before I Sleep," The Story of Paul Lawrence Dunbar

Box 2

Folder 17

"Apostle of Freedom -- Richard Allen," 4/24/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for program on Richard Allen

Box 2

Folder 18

Josh White, 5/1/49, Dest. Freedom

"Help the Blind," The Story of Josh White

Box 2

Folder 19

Satchel Paige, 5/15/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Ballad of Satchel Paige"

Box 2

Folder 20

Benjamin Banneker, 5/22/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Secretary of Peace," The Story of Benjamin Banneker

Box 2

Folder 21

Henry Armstrong, 5/29/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Saga of Melody Jackson," The Story of Henry Armstrong

Box 2

Folder 22

Rev. Archibald Carey, 6/5/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Anatomy of an Ordinance," The Story of Reverend Archibald Carey

Box 2

Folder 23

Lena Horne, 6/12/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Negro Cinderella," The Story of Lena Horne

Box 2

Folder 24

Roscoe Dunjee, 6/19/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Ghost Editor," The Story of Roscoe Dunjee

Box 2

Folder 25

"Harriet's Children," 1st anniversary program, 6/26/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Story of the Negro in American History"

Box 2

Folder 26

Dorothy Maynor, 7/3/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Norfolk Miracle," The Story of Dorothy Maynor

Box 2

Folder 27

"Tales of Stackalee," 7/17/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Story of the Negro Paul Bunyan"

Box 2

Folder 28

"The John Henry Story," 7/24/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Legend of the Famous Steel Driver"

Box 2

Folder 29

Louis Armstrong, 7/31/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Story of Louis Armstrong, King of the Trumpeters"

Box 3

Folder 1

Mary Church Terrell, 8/7/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Long Road: The Story of Mary Church Terrell"

Box 3

Folder 2

Henri Christophe, Part I, 8/14/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Black Hamlet," The Story of Henri Christophe, Part I

Box 3

Folder 3

Henri Christophe, Part 2, 8/21/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Black Hamlet," The Story of Henri Christophe, Part II

Box 3

Folder 4

"Segregation - Incorporated," 8/28/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Segregation-Incorporated"

Box 3

Folder 5

Blanche K. Bruce, 9/4/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Saga of Blanche K. Bruce," United States Senator from Mississippi

Box 3

Folder 6

761st Tank Batallion, 9/11/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Tiger Hunt," The Story of the 761st Tank Batallion

Box 3

Folder 7

Gwendolyn Brooks, 9/18/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Poet in Bronzeville," The Story of Gwendolyn Brooks

Box 3

Folder 8

Prejudice Series, Part I, 9/25/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "A Garage in Gainesville," # 1 in a series of two on prejudice

Box 3

Folder 9

Prejudice Series, 10/2/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Execution Awaited," Number Two in a Series of Two on Prejudice

Box 3

Folder 10

Adam Clayton Powell [Sr. + Jr.], 10/9/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Father to Son," The Story of A. Clayton Powell, Senior & Junior

Box 3

Folder 11

Albert Ammons, 10/16/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Of Blood and the Boogie," The Story of Albert Ammons

Box 3

Folder 12

Jane Edna Hunter, 10/23/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Diary of a Nurse," The Story of Jane Edna Hunter

Box 3

Folder 13

Hugh Mulzac, 10/30/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Keeper of the Dream," The Story of Captain Hugh Mulzac

Box 3

Folder 14

Jean Baptiste Point DuSable, 11/6/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Man Who Owned Chicago," The Story of Jean Baptiste Point DuSable

Box 3

Folder 15

Dean Dixon, 11/13/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Blind Alley Symphony," The Story of Dean Dixon

Box 3

Folder 16

Kenneth R. Williams, 11/20/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Tale of the Tobacco Auctioneer," The Story of the Election of the Reverend Kenneth R. Williams to the City Council of Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Box 3

Folder 17

Judge Joseph Homer Rainey, 12/4/49, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Joe Rainey vs. the Status Quo," The Story of Judge Joseph Homer Rainey

Box 3

Folder 18

Urban League, 1/15/50, Dest. Freedom

"The Birth of a League," The Story of the Urban League

Box 3

Folder 19

William Henry Huff, 1/22/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Lawyer of Liberty," The Story of William Henry Huff

Box 3

Folder 20

Bill (Bojangles) Robinson, 1/29/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Portrait of Bill Robinson," The Story of Bojangles Robinson

Box 3

Folder 21

"Housing: Chicago," 2/5/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Housing: Chicago," including interview with Dr. Frank S. Horne, Assistant to Fed. Housing Adm.

Box 3

Folder 22

Carter G. Woodson, 2/12/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Recorder of History," The Story of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, Founder of "Negro History Week"

Box 3

Folder 24

Brotherhood Week, 2/19/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Brotherhood Begins at Home," celebrating the start of Brotherhood Week

Box 3

Folder 25

Todd Duncan, 2/26/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Umfundisi of Ndotsheni," The Story of Todd Duncan

Box 3

Folder 26

E. Franklin Frazier, 3/5/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Atlanta Thesis," The Story of E. Franklin Frazier

Box 3

Folder 27

"Premonition of a Panther -- Sugar Ray Robinson," 3/12/50

Script for "Premonition of a Panther," The Story of Sugar Ray Robinson

Box 3

Folder 28

Lonnie Johnson, 3/19/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Making of a Balladier," The Story of the Guitarist-Singer Lonnie Johnson

Box 3

Folder 29

William Lloyd Garrison, 3/26/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Liberators," Part I, The Story of Abolitionist Lloyd Garrison

Box 4

Folder 1

Wendell Philipps, 4/2/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Liberators," Part II, The Story of Abolitionist Wendell Philipps

Box 4

Folder 2

Buddy Young, 4/9/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Buddy Young Story"

Box 4

Folder 3

Kinzie Bleuitt, 4/16/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Fifth District Story"

Box 4

Folder 4

Katherine Dunham, 4/23/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Katherine Dunham Story"

Box 4

Folder 5

Jane Bolin, 5/7/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Judge Jane Bolin Story"

Box 4

Folder 6

"Story of Spirituals," 5/14/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Story of Spirituals"

Box 4

Folder 7

John Hope, 5/21/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The John Hope Story"

Box 4

Folder 8

Isaac Murphy, 6/4/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Isaac Murphy Story"

Box 4

Folder 9

"Fats" Waller, 6/11/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Fats Waller Story"

Box 4

Folder 10

Richard Westbrooks, 6/18/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Case of the Congressman's Train Ride"

Box 4

Folder 11

Ruth Blue Turnquist, 6/25/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "The Angel of Federal Street . . . ."

Box 4

Folder 12

Nat King Cole, 7/2/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Kansas City Phone Call"

Box 4

Folder 13

William Nickerson, Jr., 7/9/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Mr. Jerico Adjusts a Claim"

Box 4

Folder 14

Charlotte Hawkins, 7/16/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Test by Fire"

Box 4

Folder 15

Pruth McFarlin, 7/23/50, Dest. Freedom

Script for "Sing a Song for Children"

Box 4

Folder 16

Destination Freedom memorabilia

Letter dated June 6, 1949 re: WMAQ NBC in Chicago carrying Destination Freedom

Letter dated May 21, 1949 re: Destination Freedom cast appearing at Parkway Community House in Chicago Destination Freedom First Anniversary Program Clippings from Chicago Defender: "Children's Author on Coffee Hour," and "Coffee Cooler Adds Sociality to Air Shows" (April 16, 1949); "Dramatize Life of Ida B. Wells," and "Janice Kingslow, Wezlynn Tildon, Louise Pruitt, Dorothy Torkel, Guest of Honor," re: cast of Destination Freedom celebrating the first anniversary of show [n.d.] Announcement card for Destination Freedom WMAQ matchbook

Box 5

Folder 1

Great Artists Series, WGN radio, 12/18/40

Script on the life and work of Auguste Rodin by Frederick Lawton

Box 5

Folder 2

Great Artists Series, WGN Radio, 12/18/40 - 1/6/42

Script for "The Black Chip"

Box 5

Folder 3

Great Artists Series, WGN Radio, 2/11/41

Script for "Goya: The Disasters of War"

Box 5

Folder 4

Great Artists Series, WGN Radio, 11/4/41

Script for "Jose C. Orozco"

Box 5

Folder 5

Great Artists Series, WGN Radio, 1/6/42

Script for "Matisse in Morocco"

Box 5

Folder 6

Art Institute of Chicago scripts, WMAQ, 12/5/42 - 4/10/43

3 scripts from series, "Art for Our Sake"

Box 5

Folder 7

Art Institute of Chicago scripts, WMAQ, 1/16/43 - 4/10/43

3 scripts from series, "Art for Our Sake"

Box 5

Folder 8

"Legends of Illinois," WAAF, 6/23/40

Script for "Mormon Miracle," part of "Legends of Illinois" series

Box 5

Folder 9

Chicago Defender, 4/8/44

Clipping, "Crump Thinks Negroes Given Fair Treatment"

Box 5

Folder 10

Chicago Defender, 7/22/44

Clipping: "Biggest Text Book Buyer Never Got to College," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 11

Chicago Defender, 8/5/44

Clipping: "Jailer Flogs East St. Louis Bellboy, Claims He's Not Really 'Brutal Type'" by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 12

Chicago Defender, 8/19/44, [n.d.]

Two clippings: "Texas Revolution of Lily-Whites is Short-Lived" (8/19/44), and "FDR Favors Ban on Army Jim Crow - Dawson" [n.d.]

Box 5

Folder 13

Chicago Defender, 8/22/44

Clipping: "Dewey Home Town Lily White -- Mother Anti-Semitic," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 14

Chicago Defender, 8/26/44

Clipping: "Barbados Natives Find U.S. Strange Indeed," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 15

Chicago Defender, 10/7/44

Clipping: "It's True What They Say About Peoria: Kluxer's Kin Defies Jim Crow, Sets Town on Ear," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 16

Chicago Defender, 10/14/44

Clipping: "Toussaint Author Favors Race Inter-Marriage," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 17

Chicago Defender, 10/21/44

Clipping: "Dunbar Outgrows New Building in Two Years," by Richard Durham, in the Chicago Defender

Box 5

Folder 18

Chicago Defender, 1/8/45

Clipping: "Europe's Skies Prove Jim Crow's Graveyard," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 19

Chicago Defender, 2/3/45

Clipping: "War or No War, East . . . Keeps its No-Negro. . . ," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 20

Chicago Defender, 2/24/45

Clipping: "Millionaire Plots Tighter Noose on 'Black Ghetto,'" by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 21

Chicago Defender, 4/14/45

Clipping: Four Seabees Flogged; Navy Outs Commander

Box 5

Folder 22

Chicago Defender, 5/5/1945

Clipping: "Delegates Juggle Colonial Question; White, DuBois Ask Equality of Races," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 23

Chicago Defender, 5/12/45

Clipping: "Soviet Demand Wins Okay for Amendments"

Box 5

Folder 24

Chicago Defender, 5/26/45

Clipping: "Full Independence Opposed by Parley"

Box 5

Folder 25

Chicago Defender, 6/2/45

Clipping: "White Writers Duck Negro Issue -- But Lahey Loves It"

Box 5

Folder 26

Chicago Defender, 10/6/45

Clipping: "Gary Strikers Like their Equality White," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 27

Chicago Defender, 11/10/45

Clippings: "Talk, Songs Win Applause But Walkout Still on," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 28

Chicago Defender, 1/9/46

Clipping: "First Century's The Hardest: Negro Needs Atom Bomb More Than Russians, Says

Ex-Slave"

Box 5

Folder 29

Chicago Defender, n.d.

Clipping: "Dixie Comes to Chicago: 'Unholy 3' Fight Wacs in 'Black Ghetto' Plot," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 30

Chicago Defender, n.d.

Clipping: "Chinese Leader Invites Negroes to China, Hits American Jim Crow," by Richard Durham

Box 5

Folder 31

Source unknown, n.d.

Clipping: "Truman's Stand on Jim Crow Told Defender Scribe"

Box 5

Folder 32

"Action against Jim Crow," UPWA Anti-Discrimination Dept, [1952?]

Booklet

Box 6

Folder 1

Research -- American History

Reports on Crispus Attucks and the Boston Massacre

Box 6

Folder 2

Published and Unpublished Essays

"Sounds at Night," published in Pittsburgh Courier (6/1/38)

Review of "How to Win Friends and Influence People," by Dale Carnegie, published in Northwestern Review, (9/1/38) "Churches and Poverty" "Lincoln Steffens' View of Education" "Free Speech and Propaganda" "Prejudice and People"

Box 6

Folder 3

E. Dickerson speech for ASP Negro Rights Forum, 1940s

Notes on reaction to A. Philip Randolph and Earl Dickerson's speeches

Dickerson speech for ASP Negro Rights Forum

Box 6

Folder 4

Analysis of "DF" by Hugh Cordier

"A History and Analysis of Destination Freedom" by Hugh Cordier for a seminar, "Problems in Radio," at Northwestern in 1949

Box 6

Folder 5

Correspondence (1)

Various correspondence including: letter and article re: John Dunning, authority on old-time radio, May 17, 1982; Durham was interviewed on his show

Invitation to speak to the National Association of Media Women (September 18, 1969) Letter from Muhammad Ali re: producing a video program on Ali's career (March 10, 1982) Letter from Alderman Ralph Metcalfe re: crime in black community (Sept 2, 1970) Letter to Mrs. Roscoe C. Beach supporting her petition to demand the removal of J. Edgar Hoover (August 13, 1970) Letter from the Chicago Committee of Black Churchmen re: arranging a meeting with Elijah Muhammad (Sept 11, 1970) Letter from Jacob Lawrence re: biographical information (May 12, 1949) Letter from Robert Waters at Profile Public Relations re: marketing Destination Freedom and Democracy U.S.A. programs to companies that want to reach the Negro market (Feb 22, 1967) Copies of letters from Mamie Till Bradley to Office of the Secretary of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Department of Defense and the Director of the FBI re: obtaining a copy of all documents re: Emmett Till's father, Louis Till (March 29, 1982); Louis Till had been executed on charges of rape Letter from Elijah Muhammad re: Nation of Islam's paper Letter to Rick Cluchey requesting copy of a script of "The Cage," a prison drama (Oct 2, 1969) Letter to Robert Hunt, assistant circulation director of the Chicago Tribune, re: being called "boy" and "Rich" by a Tribune salesman (April 14, 1970) Letter to Luther James re: possible submissions to "On Being Black" (Dec 28, 1969)

Box 6

Folder 6

Correspondence

Letter from G. Ashanti Witherspoon dated May 24, 1981 re: personal profile and an appeal for his sentence to be reduced by the Louisiana Board of Pardons

Letter from ? Dated Jan 18, 1963 re: script, outline and copy of Stuart Chase's Story of Toad Lane Letter from Izzy dated April 25, 1944 to Pfc. Hayward Kirkpatrick re: Boss Crump Letter to Caldwell (undated) from ? re: C.G.'s condition Letter to Earl (undated) from Iz (?) re: a Duke Ellington concert Letter to Clotilde (undated) re: the writing process Letter to Andrew (undated) re: the army and the treatment of colored soldiers Letter to Andrew (undated) re: organizing and the race problem Letter to Hay dated May 25, 1944 re: Uncle Toms in Washington, D.C. Letter to Izzy from Paschal (Sept 8, 1943) re: request for Daily News Almanac Letter to RD from Paschal (Sept 29, 1943) re: soldiers at a camp in Alabama Letter from Lloyd Daly (Feb 8, 1961) re: chapter on Aesop Letter to the Editor of The Chicago Sun (June 6, 1943) re: importance of teaching children that no race is inherently superior in the postwar period Letter to Bill (undated) re: white supremacy Letter to RD from Hank August (?) (May 20, 1982) re: synopsis of autobiographical work Letter to RD from G. Ashanti Witherspoon (Sept 8, 1980) re: desire to be a writer Letter to Witherspoon from RD (undated) re: Witherspoon's letter and publication

Box 6

Folder 7

Corresp. - 1948

Letter to Homer Heck, dated June 27, 1948 re: Negro characterizations; letter from Charles Chignbard (?) of NBC praising Durham's writing

Box 6

Folder 8

John Hay Whitney Foundation, 1951 Corresp.

Various correspondence between RD and Robert Weaver (and Weaver's secretary, Georgine Lovesky) (April 25, Sept 21, Aug 28, April 12, March 23, Feb 13, 1951; June 20, 1950) to RD from Robert Weaver (April 25, 1951) re: Opportunity Fellowship; essay on RD's credentials;

Box 6

Folder 9

News Clippings 1950 - 81

Clippings including: "Soul Soap Opera" on Durham's Bird of the Iron Feather, "Birth of the Bird: New soap opera 'will be blacker and more soulful than anything else of TV,'" "Demise of TV 'Soul Series' is Explained"

Clippings including: newspaper poetry clippings, photograph of Mrs. Chanie Durham, Durham's mother, viewing a photography display featuring Durham's work, awards won by Durham and "Destination Freedom," an article by Durham including "Negro Needs Atom: First Century the Hardest, Ex-Slave Finds."

Box 6

Folder 10

"Notes on the Union: Conflicts, Characters . . . "

Script for "The Unions: The Hot and the Cold," and series of notes including: "Of Travis Sange," "The Union Inner Group," "The Poker Ritual," "The Chief," "Issues and Contradictions in Fight." Also includes a memo to all Swift Chain Locals from Swift Local #28, UPWA-AFL-CIO re: the nomination of Sidney Johnson for vice president of UPWA-AFL-CIO to replace Russell Lasley

Box 6

Folder 11

"Notes on Characters"

Various notes on characters and scripts

Box 6

Folder 12

"Poetry by Richard"

Various poems by Durham; copy of Opportunity magazine (Sept 1939) that includes poem by Isadore (Richard) Durham; correspondence from New Masses dated April 18, 1938 re: acceptance of Durham's poem, "Hell's Kitchen," booklet labeled Verne Durham with clippings in German and note from Langston Hughes about how he would like the poems in English as he can not read German

Box 7

Folder 1

"Democracy, USA" script, 8/31/46

The story of Harry B. Deas, the only Negro police captain in Chicago

Box 7

Folder 2

"Democracy, USA" script, 9/29/1946

The story of Walter White, author, columnist and executive secretary of the NAACP

Box 7

Folder 3

"Democracy, USA" script, 10/13/1946

"Dr. Dailey and the Living Human Heart"

Box 7

Folder 4

"Democracy, USA" script, 12/1/46

"Dr. J. Ernest Wilkins - Master Mathematician"

Box 7

Folder 5

"Democracy, USA" script, 12/22/46

"Colonel B.O. Davis, Commander of the 332nd Fighter Squadron"

Box 7

Folder 6

"Democracy, USA" script, 1/12/47

"Albert W. Williams -- President of the Unity Mutual Insurance Company"

Box 7

Folder 7

"Democracy, USA" script, 2/9/47

Dr. Charles Wesley, president of Wilberforce University

Box 7

Folder 8

"Democracy, USA" script, 3/30/47

The story of Rabbi Jacob Weinstein of the K.A.M. Temple

Box 7

Folder 9

"Democracy, USA" script, 8/17/47

The story of artist Charles Dawson

Box 7

Folder 10

"Democracy, USA" script, 8/31/47

The story of Melvin Walker, Olympic athlete and international high jump champion

Box 7

Folder 11

"Democracy, USA" script, 11/16/47

The story of Charles Drew, head of Howard University School of Surgery and former director of the American Red Cross' first blood bank

Box 7

Folder 12

"Democracy, USA" script, 2/15/48

The story of Indiana's Albert Merrit

Box 7

Folder 13

"Democracy, USA" Biography sketches

Biographical material about subjects of "Democracy, USA"

Box 7

Folder 14

"Democracy, USA" Mayor Kelly script drafts

Box 7

Folder 15

Bird of the Iron Feather - Characters list

List and description of characters

Box 7

Folder 16

Bird of the Iron Feather -- Storyline

Description of the storyline of Bird of the Iron Feather

Box 7

Folder 17

Bird of the Iron Feather, chap. 1

Chapter 1: "Prescription for a Pallbearer"

Box 7

Folder 18

Bird of the Iron Feather

Chapter VI: "Speaking of Dreams"

Box 7

Folder 19

Bird of the Iron Feather

Chapter IX: "The Hard Way to Play the Blues"

Box 7

Folder 20

Bird of the Iron Feather

Chapter VIII: "Theme for Unfinished Faces"

Box 7

Folder 21

Bird of the Iron Feather

"Of Music and My Father," Part I, "One Man's Hands, Another Man's Soul"

Box 7

Folder 22

Bird of the Iron Feather

"Piano Lesson"

Box 7

Folder 23

Bird of the Iron Feather ("Sermon")

"The Sermon"

Box 7

Folder 24

Bird of the Iron Feather

Excerpts from script

Box 8

Folder 1

Script draft fragments

Box 8

Folder 2

Durham - Biog. Sketch and Works, written by Clarice Durham (1999)

Box 8

4 black leather notebooks

"Transitions," various notes and script drafts, descriptions of people, conversations, letters of Lincoln Steffens, notes on psychology

No folders

Box 9

Folder 1

Durham vs. NBC (1) (1946 - 1956)

Contract for Radio Show "Democracy USA" between the Chicago Defender and Durham; correspondence, memoranda, legal documents re: lawsuit between Durham and NBC; newspaper clippings re: "Here Comes Tomorrow" cast

Box 9

Folder 2

Durham vs. NBC (2) (1948 - 1957)

Correspondence between William Rossmoore (Durham's lawyer) and Durham re: Durham's lawsuit against NBC; correspondence between Metropolitan Mutual Assurance Company of Chicago and Durham re: sponsorship of "Destination Freedom;" exhibits from lawsuit (newspaper clippings and Broadcasting magazine article about awards won by Destination Freedom; announcement for a community social after the broadcast of "Destination Freedom;" WMAQ announcement re: debut of Destination Freedom on WMAQ; newspaper clippings with program schedule for "Destination Freedom;" advertising for WMAQ and Destination Freedom

Box 9

Folder 3

Durham vs. NBC (3) (1943 - 1978)

Press releases re: return of "Destination Freedom," Durham's lawsuit against NBC Copies of Destination Freedom scripts (Nathan Hale, three Latvians immigrating to America, "Weapons for Peace")

Correspondence re: Destination Freedom from the New York Public Library (Sept 11, 1978) Copy of "Radio's Black Heritage" by J. Fred MacDonald; Freedom Foundation awards booklet; posters of WMAQ program schedules (including reprint of article, "Meet the Stars Who Bring You 'Destination Freedom'); legal materials re: lawsuit between Durham and NBC; Isadore Durham's certificate from the Summer Radio Institute; Richard Durham's certificate from the National Negro Museum and Historical Foundation; list of station awards

Box 9

Folder 4

Durham vs. NBC (4) (1947 - 1978)

Clippings re: "Here Comes Tomorrow" and "Destination Freedom;" notecards re: Durham's programs, publications and awards; copy of article, "Radio's Black Heritage: Destination Freedom, 1948-1950," by Dr. J. Fred MacDonald, published in Phylon (March 1978); press release re: Durham's lawsuit against NBC

Box 9

Folder 5

Durham vs. NBC (1954 - 1955)

Correspondence between William Rossmoore and Durham re: Durham's lawsuit against NBC and list of press releases about "Destination Freedom," handwritten note titled "Stuff for article on Destination," small notebooks with notes pertaining to Destination Freedom and lawsuit

Box 9

Folder 6

Durham v. NBC

Destination Freedom scripts: Dorie Miller, Jackie Robinson and Jesse Owens

Box 9

Folder 7

Durham v. NBC

Overview of Destination Freedom including discussion of "why your company should sponsor 'Destination Freedom'"

Box 9

Folder 8

Durham v. NBC

Description of "Destination Freedom," and scripts: Canada Lee and Dr. V. G. Dailey and Dr. Daniel Williams

Box 10

Folder 1

Birds of the Iron Feather, TV Scripts

List of TV scripts in this series

Box 10

Folder 2

Untitled folder

Script: "Jonah and the Whales"

Box 10

Folder 3

Untitled folder

Script: "Prescription for Pallbearers"

Box 10

Folder 4

Untitled folder

Script: "Clients for the Castrated Crocodile," Part I & II

Box 10

Folder 5

Untitled folder

Script: "Cry of the Silent"

Box 10

Folder 6

Untitled folder

Script: "Theme for the Unfinished Faces"

Box 10

Folder 7

Untitled folder

Script: "Day of the Exterminators"

Box 10

Folder 8

Untitled folder

Script: "Crossroads"

Box 10

Folder 9

Untitled folder

Script: "The Last Payment"

Script: "The Target"

Box 10

Folder 10

Untitled folder

Script: "Tomorrow, in Name Only"

Box 10

Folder 11

Untitled folder

Script: "Cry of the Silent"

Box 10

Folder 12

Untitled folder

Script: "The Contract Prisoner"

Box 10

Folder 13

Untitled folder

Script: "Rotten Apples"

Box 10

Folder 14

Untitled folder

Script: "The Young Coffins"

Box 10

Folder 15

Untitled folder

Script: "The Hospital"

Excerpt from Chapter 21 Titled: Crime, The Original

Box 10

Folder 16

Untitled folder

Script: "One of the Worst Days in My Life"

Box 11

Folder 1

"The Greatest," final typescript

Passage to insert, drafts of title, copyright, dedication and table of contents pages

Box 11

Folder 2

Untitled folder

Typescript of "Shorty is Waiting," pages 1 - 101

Box 11

Folder 3

Untitled folder

Typescript continues, pages 102 - 199

Box 11

Folder 4

Untitled folder

Typescript continues, pages 200 - 267B

Box 11

Folder 5

Untitled folder

Revised sample pages of "Shorty is Waiting;" typescript continues, pages 3- 34; typescript of "Archie - Am I Too Old," various pages

Box 11

Folder 6

Untitled folder

Typescript of "This Message is Not for the Coward," pages 368 - 511

Box 11

Folder 7

Untitled folder

Typescript of "Preparations for the Second Coming," pages 513 - 653 and for "The Contract," pages 517 - 530

Box 12

Folder 1

"The Greatest," page proofs

Page proofs: chronology, copyright, acknowledgement and table of content pages; pages 3 - 57

Box 12

Folder 2

Untitled folder

Page proofs: "The First Coming," pages 1 - 23

Box 12

Folder 3

Untitled folder

Page proofs: "The Prophecy of Sell-Out Moe," pages 58 - 83; "The Induction," pages 84 - 106; "God Bless the Child," pages 107 - 133; "Old Friends and Dinosaurs," pages 134 - 183; "Dinosaurs in a Park," pages 167 - 183

Box 12

Folder 4

Untitled folder

Page proofs: "Dinosaurs in a Park," pages 184 - 190; "Resurrection," pages 191 - 196; "Gyms Before Judgment," pages 197 - 214; "The Second Coming," pages 215 - 239

Box 12

Folder 5

Untitled folder

Page proofs: "For the Victims," pages 240 - 250; "The Dinosaurs Meet," pages 251 - 261; additional pages, 261a - 261p

Box 12

Folder 6

Untitled folder

Page proofs: "The Contract," pages 262 - 269; "The Bossman Comes," pages 270 - 283; "Bomaye," pages 284 - 304; "About Richard Durham"

Box 12

Folder 7

Untitled folder

Page proofs: table of contents, pages 17 - 181

Box 12

Folder 8

Untitled folder

Page proofs: pages 182 - 303

Box 12

Folder 9

Untitled folder

Page proofs: pages 304 - 405

Box 12

Folder 10

Untitled folder

Page proofs: pages 268, 300, 413 - 414, dedication page, table of contents, pages 11 - 14, various pages

Box 12

Folder 11

Untitled folder

Page proofs: various pages

Box 12

Folder 12

Untitled folder

Page proofs: various pages

Series II: Photographs and Audio-Visual Materials, 1949, 1970, 1999, 2007

Box 13

Durham 001

Destination Freedom cast, 1949

Box 13

Durham 002

Destination Freedom, Community Program, 1949, [VGH on left]

Box 13

Durham 003

"Bird of the Iron Feather" interview, 1970

Box 13

Durham 004

"Bird of the Iron Feather" interview

Box 13

Durham 005

Louise Pruitt, actress, Destination Freedom, 1949

Box 13

Durham 006

Destination Freedom, 1949, Fred Pinkard

Box 13

Durham 007

Destination Freedom, "Community Coffee Sip," 1949

Box 13

Durham 008

Destination Freedom, 1949, Technician

Box 13

Durham 009

Oscar Brown, Jr., Destination Freedom, 1949

Box 13

Durham 010

Destination Freedom, 1949, Janice Kingslow

Box 13

Durham 011

Destination Freedom set, NBC Studio, 1949

Box 13

Durham 012

Richard Durham writing "Destination Freedom," 1949

Box 13

Durham 013

Destination Freedom, 1949, Technician

Box 13

Durham 014

Destination Freedom, 1949, "Community Coffee Sip"

Box 13

Durham 015

Destination Freedom publicity

Box 13

Durham 016

"Destination Freedom Coffee Cooler"

Box 13

Durham 017

Destination Freedom musician

Box 13

Durham 018

Destination Freedom, 1949, Richard Durham

Box 13

Durham 019

Janice Kingslow, Destination Freedom, 1949

Box 13

Durham 020

Destination Freedom, 1949, Homer Heck

Box 13

Durham 021

Louise Pruitt (?), Destination Freedom, 1949

Box 13

Durham 022

Destination Freedom actors

Box 13

Durham 023

Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Box 13

Durham 024

Ida B. Wells - Barnett

Box 13

Durham 025

Destination Freedom, Janice Kingslow behind the camera, 1949

Box 13

Durham 027

Harriet Tubman script, page 2

Box 13

Durham 028

  • Honorable withdrawal card, American Newspaper Guild
  • Audio-Visual Materials
  • VHS tape
  • "The Sound of Freedom," by Afaf Qayyum, 1999 Chicago Metro History Fair CD
  • Interview with Clarice Davis Durham and Charles Davis recorded by StoryCorps Griot in July 2007

Series III: Serials, 1960 - 1975

Box 14

Serials

  • Muhammad Speaks, Vol., No. 1
  • Muhammad Speaks, April 18, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, April 11, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, April 4, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, January 31, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, January 24, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, January 17, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, February 14, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, January 10, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, January 3, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, February 21, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, June 27, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, June 20, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, June 6, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, July 4, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, June 11, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, July 18, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, August 1, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, August 8, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, August 15, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, September 19, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, September 5, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, May 23, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, May 16, 1975
  • Muhammad Speaks, April 25, 1975
  • Large copies of May 1960 issue; reprint of "Christianity is Not a Religion for You and Me"
  • Unboxed Materials -- Oversize
  • Bound copies of Muhammad Speaks: Volume IV (September 1964 - September 1965), VI-A (February 1966 - March 1967), VI-B (March - April 1967)